Vindaloo Curry

Goan Pork Vindaloo Curry

I do love a good, hot curry. However a Vindaloo curry from the local Indian Restaurant or takeaway would never be first choice as it simply is a hot curry. Heat a priority, flavour secondary.

Vindaloo Curry

Vindaloo originates from the Indian region of Goa. This region is heavily influenced by the Portuguese settlers. It also has a quite large Christian population meaning that pork, a meat rarely eaten in India, can be found on the menu.

So a traditional Vindaloo Curry is made with wine, vinegar and copious amounts of garlic. The name Vindaloo comes from the Portuguese language. ‘Vinho’ meaning wine and ‘alho’ meaning garlic. Quite a few people think that the ‘aloo’ in Vindaloo means potato. Strangely enough many British Indian Restaurants do put potato in there Vindaloo, just to confuse things further!

Vindaloo Curry Spices

Vindaloo Curry, How Hot Can You Go?

My recipe for Vindaloo is spicy but no where near as spicy as the dish you would get in a British Indian Restaurant.

If you want more heat it’s quite easy to adapt the recipe. Either add some chilli powder when you fry the masala off. Or add more fresh chillies. Birdseye chillies are great in this dish as are the thin Thai chillies which I believe are a type of cayenne. The other option is to add some chilli pickle towards the end. Naga Pickle, of course, is always going to add plenty of heat!

On the other hand you may fancy the sound of this dish but you’re not a fan of hot curries. If that’s the case then just add however much or little fresh chillies as you want.

But I Like Aloo In My Vindaloo?

If that’s the case then add some! Simply boil a few cubed potatoes so they’re not quite cooked and then throw them in your Vindaloo for the last 20-30 minutes of cooking.

If you like the look of this recipe you might want to check out the recipe for Lamb Madras

Vindaloo Curry

‘Ome Made Goan Pork Vindaloo

‘Ome
A rich, spicy Goan Pork Vindaloo based on a traditional recipe but with a touch of British Indian Restaurant influence. This is a far superior dish than you would find in most British restaurants and takeaways though!
No ratings yet
Prep Time 30 mins
Cook Time 3 hrs
Course Main Dish
Cuisine Indian
Servings 6 people

Ingredients
  

Marinade

  • 1 tsp salt
  • 6 garlic cloves finely chopped or grated or 5-6 tsp garlic paste
  • 6 red chillies finely chopped use less or more to taste and depending on the variety. 6 birds eye chillies will be hotter than 6 snub chillies for instance. I used 6 birds eye chillies
  • 200 ml red wine plus a glass for yourself!
  • 3 tbsp red wine vinegar

Curry

  • 4 tbsp oil
  • 12 whole fresh curry leaves optional
  • 1 stick of cassia or cinnamon
  • 1 whole star anise
  • 2 tsp black mustard seeds
  • 3 large onions finely chopped or blitzed in a blender/food processor for a more restaurant style
  • 6 cloves garlic finely chopped grated or blitzed in a grinder
  • 3 tsp Kashmiri chilli powder
  • 2 tbsp mild curry Masala I used ‘Ome Made B.I.R Curry Masala, obviously!
  • 3 tbsp tomato puree added to 800ml hot water
  • 2 tsp of tamarind paste/concentrate or 2 Tbsp lemon juice
  • 1 tbsp sugar I used jaggary but any will do but the darker sugars work the best
  • 1 tbsp Garam Masala again I used ‘Ome Made, other brands are available
  • 1 handful chopped fresh coriander
  • 3 medium tomatoes roughly chopped
  • 6 red chillies sliced Again add more if you like heat, less if you don’t. I used 8 birdseye chillies, a few sliced and a few whole so they could be dished up to the ones that like extra heat
  • 1 tsp salt or to taste

Instructions
 

Marinate The Pork

  • Rub the salt in to the meat followed by the garlic and chillies. Add the wine and vinegar, give a stir, cover and refrigerate. Leave to marinate for at least 3 hours but overnight is better.

Cooking The Curry

  • Heat the oil in a kadai or heavy bottomed pan.
  • Add the whole spices (curry leaves, mustard seeds, star anise and cassia) careful as they may splutter if the oil is too hot.
  • Once the spices are sizzling and mustard seeds popping add the onion and salt. Continue to cook on a gentle heat for 15 minutes or so.
  • Add the garlic and fry for another couple of minutes.
  • Add the Kashmiri chilli powder and stir in, continue to fry until the mixture is a nice deep red colour. Add a splash of water if it starts to stick.
  • Add the curry Masala and continue to fry for a couple minutes. If it starts to stick add a little of the tomato puree/water mix.
  • Add half of the tomato puree and water mix. Turn the heat up and reduce back down to a thick paste.
  • Add the rest of the tomato puree/water mix and continue to reduce until you have a nice thick sauce.
  • Add the pork and the marinade and stir through.
  • Turn the pan down to the lowest you can. It wants to be barely a simmer.
  • Cook for around 2.5 hours after which time the sauce should be nice and thick.
  • Add the rest of the ingredients and cook for another 30 minutes. If the sauce is too thick for your liking just loosen with a little hot water.
  • Check the seasoning and add more salt if needed.
  • Serve with rice and Indian bread

Notes

This recipe takes a more traditional recipe but I have used the tomato puree in water method which gives the dish a nice rich sauce. The traditional method is slightly thinner.
As far as heat goes this is a nice spicy dish but nowhere near as hot as you would get in an Indian restaurant. It also relies on fresh chillies for the heat. If you like it hot I would suggest adding a couple of teaspoons of chilli powder with your curry Masala or you could up the fresh chillies or add a few teaspoons of Naga pickle!
Once you have added your meat this could be cooked covered in the oven on a moderate heat or you could put it in a slow cooker.
If you are worried about using pork shoulder because of the fat, don’t. with the slow cooking all the fat renders down and gives you a lovely rich sauce and it shouldn’t be swimming in oil. You could of course use another cut such a s loin of fillet but cut down on the cooking time. This recipe will also work with chicken thigh but again cut down on the cooking time.
Keyword goan, Indian, pork, Vindaloo
Tried this recipe?Let us know how it was!

Beef Chilli

Beef Chilli

Beef Chilli always seems to go down well with most people, we love it in our house.

It’s one of those dishes you can just throw together, I don’t think any two of my chillies I’ve cooked have been the same!

I have put this recipe together though to cover the basics and a few tips to help you with the cooking techniques.

Tomatoes

For me a Beef chilli has to be heavy on the tomatoes. Skimp on the tomatoes and your going to end up with a lacklustre dish. Don’t forget in some parts of the US a Chilli is referred to as ‘A big bowl of red’, well where do you think that red comes from?

I recommend using a hefty amount of tomato paste, a teaspoon just isn’t going to cut it here! I also add tinned tomatoes as well.

Spices & Herbs For Your Beef Chilli

Chilli has its origins in Mexico. Chilli Con Carne is really just a poor imitation of a Mexican Mole. Just because it’s an imitation though doesn’t mean it can’t be a great dish in it’s own right.

So thinking about the Mexican influence, the spices that you simply must have are chilli (obviously), ground cumin and oregano. I also add fresh coriander but that may not be to everyones taste.

A little cinnamon works nicely too but I’ve missed that out on this recipe. If you want to try it add a 1/4 teaspoon and see how you get on with that.

Sweet & Sour

A lot of dishes that are tomato based need something a little extra to bring it together. A combination of something sweet and sour works wonders.

For this recipe I’ve kept it simple and just used a little sugar and vinegar. You could replace the vinegar for a squeeze of lime.

Beef Chilli Chillies!

Obviously chillies are a major part of a chilli! You don’t have to use fresh though. If you have no fresh just increase the amount of dried your using.

Fresh chillies do add a nice zing though and of course you can play around with the varieties your using. In this one I used a combination of standard red chillies and Scotch Bonnets.

Also you could try getting a variety of dried chilli pods and grinding your own chilli powder. I particularly like a combination of Ancho, Pasilla, Mullato and chillies de Arbol.

Of course you could try adding one of my ‘Ome Made Rub-a-Dub-Rubs to the mix. I have 2 which are South American based and ideal for a chilli. They are Spirit Of The Jaguar Rub-a-Dub-Rub and Adobo Loco Rub-a-Dub-Rub. You can find them here omemade.co.uk

Cooking

To get the best flavours you need to cook your chilli correctly. It’s quite easy.

First off, get those onions cooked. You want to cook all the moisture out of the onions, the salt helps drawer the moisture out. You then want to bring out the natural sweetness of the onion by slightly caramelising the onion, which is why you cook it ’till it’s starting to turn a pale brown colour.

Brown your meat. Simple, it seals it and caramelises all those lovely juices. To achieve this make sure you have a pan big enough so the meat can spread out, if it’s overcrowded it will just steam.

Evaporate any liquid before adding the tomato paste, if you do you know you’re concentrating all those flavours in the pan and everything is going to be cooked out correctly.

And that’s about it, Here’s the recipe. Enjoy and don’t forget to add your own embellishments to make it your perfect Chilli recipe!

Beef Chilli

Beef Chilli

‘Ome
A basic recipe for a spicy, tomato rich beef chilli.
No ratings yet
Prep Time 15 mins
Cook Time 1 hr
Total Time 1 hr 15 mins
Course Main Dish
Cuisine American
Servings 4 people

Ingredients
  

  • 500 g minced beef
  • 150 g dried beans I use a mix of kidney and pinto, soaked overnight. Or you could use tinned (400g tin will be fine)
  • 1 medium onion diced
  • 4 cloves garlic finely chopped or grated
  • 1.5 tbsp oil (neutral flavoured)
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 2 each red chillies Add more or less to taste, If you like it hot, try some fresh Scotch bonnets.
  • 1 each red pepper diced
  • 1 tsp ground cumin
  • 1 tsp chilli powder or to taste
  • 1 tsp 'Ome Made Adobo Loco Rub-a-Dub-Rub (optional)
  • 2 tsp sugar
  • 2 tsp vinegar White/red wine or cider work best
  • 1 each beef stock cube
  • 40 g tomato paste (a hefty tablespoon)
  • 400 g chopped tinned tomato
  • 400 ml water an empty tomato cans worth!
  • 1 tbsp fresh oregano finely chopped (use 1 tsp dried to replace fresh)
  • 1 tbsp fresh coriander finely chopped (optional)
  • 6 good turns of freshly ground black pepper

Instructions
 

  • Drain the beans and cover with fresh water plus an inch. Bring to the boil and boil for ten minutes. Once boiled turn down to a simmer and cook for a further 20 minutes then drain.
  • Heat the oil in a heavy bottomed pan and add the onion and salt. Cook gently for 10 minutes until the onion is starting to brown.
  • Add the garlic to the pan and fry for 20 seconds.
  • Add the minced beef to the pan. Stir to break up and cook until browned.
  • Add the dried spices and black pepper to the meat and continue to fry for a minute.
  • Add the fresh chillies and red pepper and stir
  • Add the sugar, vinegar and the crumbled stock cube, turn up the heat to reduce any liquid in the pan.
  • Once most of the liquid has evaporated add the tomato paste and fry for a further 20 seconds or so,
  • add the tinned tomatoes plus 1 can full of water.
  • Add the cooked and drained beans, the oregano and coriander.
  • Cook on a gentle simmer for 50 minutes to and hour, add more water if needed. Or alternatively put in a slow cooker to finish cooking, give it a t least 3 hours. Or you can put in a low oven at 100C for at least 3 hours but up to 5. Just check the liquid levels and add more water if needed.
Keyword Beef, carne, chilli, con
Tried this recipe?Let us know how it was!
Chicken Jalfrezi

Chicken Jalfrezi

Chicken Jalfrezi is a favourite curry. It’s my go to curry when I have some leftover Tandoori Chicken. In fact it’s worth making some Tandoori Chicken Just to make a Jalfrezi!

What Makes A Chicken Jalfrezi?

Jalfrezi has it’s origins in Bengal. It was a way of using leftover meat or fish that was stir fried with onions, chillies and often peppers.

The B.I.R (British Indian Restaurant) version has more of a tomato sauce but it still has the onions, peppers, chillies and sometimes tomatoes.

I also like plenty of ginger in a jalfrezi, it gives it a lovely fresh ‘zing’

I used little Thai chillies in this version that pack some serious heat. It’s entirely up to you what sort of chillies you want to use and how you present them. Some people prefer their chilli to be chopped more, which is fine.

I prefer to use normal sized salad tomatoes for a Jalfrezi, cut in to quarters or sixths. On this occasion I had run out so I threw some cherry tomatoes in, you might prefer this option though.

Base Sauce

I’ve included a recipe for base sauce for this Chicken jalfrezi. It’s a very simple one but I love it!

If you have your own tried and trusted base sauce you can use that instead of the one in the recipe. If it’s not heavy on the tomatoes though you might want to add a little extra tomato puree or some tinned chopped tomatoes.

If you don’t use all the base sauce. Just pop it in a container for the freezer for another time.

Curry Masala & Spices

I obviously use ‘Ome Made B.I.R Curry Masala & Tandoori Masala when I was making this which are available to buy at www.omemade.co.uk

B.I.R Curry Masala

You can substitute your favourite brand or your own if you have your own favourite mix.

If you are in the Derby area you might want to give The Herb And Spice Emporium a look up for your spices. Great selection, service and very reasonable prices. Check out there Facebook page here The Herb And Spice Emporium

And if you’re stuck for a Tandoori recipe follow this link British Indian Restaurant Curry

Happy cooking!

Chicken Jalfrezi

Chicken Jalfrezi

‘Ome
This is my go to dish when I have leftover Tandoori Chicken to use in a curry. Hot & Spicy with plenty of fresh peppers, onions and tomato.
No ratings yet
Prep Time 20 mins
Cook Time 30 mins
Base Sauce 1 hr 30 mins
Total Time 2 hrs 20 mins
Course Main Course
Cuisine Indian
Servings 4 people

Ingredients
  

Curry Base Sauce

  • 4 tbsp oil (vegetable, sunflower, rapeseed)
  • 3 large onions sliced
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 3 cloves garlic chopped
  • 1 inch piece fresh ginger chopped
  • 3 tsp mild curry masala (you could use 1 tsp ground cumin, 1 tsp ground coriander, 1 tsp turmeric instead)
  • 1.2 litres water
  • 1 handful coriander stalks (if you have them)
  • 1 400ml tin of tomatoes

Chicken Jalfrezi

  • 500 g Tandoori/Tikka Chicken cut in to chunks
  • 1 medium onion cut in half and then quarter each half
  • 2 whole peppers (whatever colour you have) deseeded and roughly chopped
  • 4 cloves garlic grated or finely chopped
  • 1 inch cubed fresh ginger grated or finely chopped
  • 4 tbsp oil or ghee
  • 1 tsp Kashmiri Chilli powder (optional)
  • 4 tsp curry masala
  • 1 tsp Tandoori masala
  • 1 tsp ground turmeric
  • 1 tsp chilli powder
  • 2 tbsp tomato puree diluted in 300ml water
  • 1 portion base sauce mix
  • 1 tbsp Kasoori Methi (dried fenugreek) leaves
  • 4 large tomatoes cut in to 4 – 6 (or around 250g of cherry tomatoes, left whole)
  • 6-8 finger type chillies cut in half and half again if large (or leave whole if small)
  • 1 handful chopped fresh coriander
  • 1 tsp salt to taste
  • 1 tsp Garam Masala If you don't have any a grind of black pepper

Instructions
 

To make the base sauce

  • Heat the oil in a large pan. Once hot add the onions and salt. Gently fry for 10 minutes until the onions are starting to soften.
  • Add the garlic and ginger and fry for a couple more minutes.
  • Add the curry masala or spices along with a splash of water. Give a quick stir around and then add the water.
  • Bring to a simmer and cook for 45 minutes.
  • Add the tinned tomato and coriander stalks/
  • Bring back to the simmer and cook for another 30 minutes
  • Take the pan off the heat and blitz with an immersion blender until you have a very smooth sauce.
  • Put back on a low heat ready for adding to your curry. If it looks a little thick add some water. It should be the be slightly thicker than full fat milk.

To make the curry

  • heat the oil in a heavy bottomed pan or karahi.
  • Once the oil is hot add the onion and peppers. Fry until they are just blistering and colouring. remove the peppers and onions from the pan with a slotted spoon and put in a bowl.
    Peppers & Onions For Jalfrezi
  • turn the heat down on the pan and add the garlic and ginger. Fry for a few seconds
  • Add the Kashmiri chilli and stir through. Add the curry masala, tandoori masala and other spices. mix in and fry for 20 seconds or so. If they start to catch add a splash of the water/tomato puree.
    Diluted Tomato Puree
  • Turn the heat up to medium and add the Tomato paste and water. let this simmer and reduce down almost to a paste.
    Reducing Dilute Tomato Puree
  • now add a couple ladles of base sauce, stir in a and let reduce. Now add 3 ladles of base sauce and let reduce. Now you can add most of the base gravy (leave around 200ml for adjusting your finished sauce) and simmer until you have a thick sauce and see little craters appearing. Don't stir to often as the sauce reduces. You want the sauce to caramelise around the edges of the pan and then the caramelised edges can be stirred in to the sauce. That's where all the flavour is.
  • Now you can add your chicken, Kasoori Methi, garam masala, tomatoes, chillies, peppers and onions. Heat through for around 15 minutes, if the sauce is too thick add more base sauce 'till you have your preferred consistency and then add your chopped coriander. Heat gently for another 5 minutes. Taste and add extra salt to taste.
    Chicken Jalfrezi
  • Serve your curry with some pilau rice and Indian bread such as naans or chapatis.
    Chicken Jalfrezi
Keyword Base Curry Sauce, British, curry, Indian, Jalfrezi, Ome Made, Restaurant
Tried this recipe?Let us know how it was!
Lamb Madras

Lamb Madras

I do love a Lamb Madras. The good thing about a Madras is it can be as simple or as complicated as you like.

The basics of Madras are tomatoes, something sharp & sour such as lemon juice or tamarind and plenty of chilli heat.

As we don’t have lamb curry all that often I decided to go to town with this recipe with a deep, rich sauce.

The Lamb Madras Curry Gravy

This recipe has a curry gravy which is made separately. There is enough gravy for the Lamb Madras and I had about 250ml left which could be frozen and used in another curry at another time. If you like plenty of sauce though you may decide to use all of it.

The Lamb

For this recipe I used lamb shoulder, off the bone. You could of course use leg or neck and it’s entirely up to you if you want to leave the meat on the bone.

I didn’t pre-cook the meat in this recipe. I added the lamb to 1/2 of the gravy which had been allowed to reduce so it was nice and thick. This coated and sealed the lamb before I added the rest of the gravy and allowed the dish to cook slowly, resulting in a deep rich sauce.

The lamb would be cooked after 45 minutes but in my opinion its best left for 1.5 hours so it’s melt in the mouth tender.

The Heat

We have our Madras reasonably hot but the level of heat can be altered to suit your taste with the addition of chilli powder for more heat or less chilli powder if you want something milder.

Of course you could add fresh chillies or if you like real heat try adding some Naga Chilli Pickle!

For More Curry Recipes Click Here

Click Here To Buy ‘Ome Made Curry Masalas

For my recipe I use ‘Ome Made Curry masalas. Of course the recipe will work with your own or favourite brand of curry powder.

Lamb Madras

Lamb Madras

‘Ome
Lamb cooked in a thick, rich & spicy Indian curry sauce.
No ratings yet
Prep Time 45 mins
Cook Time 3 hrs
Total Time 3 hrs 45 mins
Course Main Course
Cuisine Indian
Servings 8

Ingredients
  

Curry Gravy

  • 3 tbsp oil or ghee
  • 4 whole cloves
  • 3 whole cardamom
  • 1 tsp cumin seeds
  • 1 tsp coriander seeds
  • 2 whole Tej Patia (Indian bay) optional
  • 1/2 tsp mustard seeds
  • 2 medium onions chopped
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 4 cloves garlic chopped
  • 1 inch cubed fresh ginger chopped
  • 1 tsp ground turmeric
  • 1 tsp sweet paprika
  • 1 whole red pepper
  • 2 tbsp tomato puree
  • 2 x 400 gram tinned chopped tomatoes
  • 1 handful coriander stalks

Lamb Madras

  • 900 gram lamb shoulder diced (1/2 inch thick)
  • 2 tbsp oil or ghee
  • 3 sticks cinnamon
  • 2 whole star anise
  • 1 medium onion finely chopped
  • 6 cloves garlic finely chopped or grated
  • 1 inch cubed fresh ginger finely chopped or grated
  • 3 tsp Kashmiri chilli powder (use sweet paprika if unavailable)
  • 2 tbsp 'Ome Made Madras Curry powder or your own/different brand
  • 3-4 tsp chilli powder
  • 2 tsp tamarind paste
  • 1 tbsp Katsuri methi/dried fenugreek
  • 3 tsp 'Ome Made Garam Masala or your own/different brand
  • 1 lemon juice of
  • 4 tsp sugar
  • 1 tbsp ground almonds
  • 1 tbsp coconut milk powder or 30g creamed coconut block
  • 2 tbsp fresh coriander chopped
  • 1 tsp salt or to taste

Instructions
 

Curry Gravy

  • Heat the oil in a heavy bottomed pan
  • Add the whole spices and gently fry for 30 seconds.
  • Add the chopped onions and salt. cook gently until soft and light brown
  • Add the chopped garlic and ginger. Cook for 30 seconds
    Lamb Madras Gravy
  • Add all the ground spices and the red pepper. cook for 30 to 60 seconds
  • Add the tomato puree and stir in
  • Add the tinned tomatoes and water. Bring to a simmer
  • Add the coriander stalks.
    Lamb Madras Gravy
  • Cook for around 45 minutes
  • Remove the Tej Patia leaves if used and blend with a stick blender
    Curry Gravy After Blending

Cooking The Curry

  • Heat the oil in a heavy bottomed pan or Karahi.
  • Add the cinnamon and star anise. fry gently for 30 seconds
    Frying Whole Spices
  • Add the onion and fry for a couple of minutes.
  • Add the garlic and ginger and fry for 30 seconds or so.
  • Add the Kashmiri chilli, stir in and cook until the mixture is a deep red colour.
  • Add the curry powder and chilli powder, fry gently for 2 to 5 minutes. If the mixture is sticking add a splash of water to loosen the mixture.
  • Add roughly half of the curry gravy, stir and bring to a vigorous simmer. This wants to reduce to a thick paste. You can partly cover the pan if you don't want it firing off everywhere!
  • Once the gravy has reduced, add the lamb. Stir and coat with the paste and cook for a couple of minutes.
  • Add more gravy to the pan to create a thick sauce, you may have a little gravy left. This can be used to add later if the sauce is too thick for you. If it all goes in you can use a little water to make the sauce to the consistency you want.
  • Cook on a gentle heat, just simmering, for at least 45 minutes but 1 to 1 1/2 hours is better.
    20 to 30 minutes before your curry is ready to serve add all the other ingredients.
  • Serve with some pilau rice and bread to mop up the lovely rich sauce!
    Lamb Madras
Keyword British, curry, Indian, Lamb, Madras, Restaurant
Tried this recipe?Let us know how it was!
Slow Roasted Moroccan Lamb

Slow Roasted Lamb Moroccan Style

One of our favourite meals in the ‘Ome Made household is slow roasted lamb Moroccan style. Lamb shoulder coated with a warming, earthy Moroccan rub.

Keep It Local!

We are lucky in Sheffield that we have so many places to buy superb locally reared lamb. Two of our favourites are Firs Farm and Whirlow Hall Farm.

Why Lamb Shoulder?

Lamb shoulder is superb for slow roasting on a low heat. Because the shoulder joint is fattier than the leg, it stays lovely and moist. The fat renders down to nothing and helps flavour the meat. After a 6 – 8 hour cook you are left with a piece of meat that is literally falling from the bone!

Add a marinade or rub to the cooking process and you end up with a incredibly tasty meal!

Variations

Don’t feel that you have to follow this recipe to the letter.

At the most basic all you need is some ‘Ome Made Moroccan Rub-a-Dub-Rub, or your own mix of spices, rubbed on to a piece of lamb which you put in a roasting pan, cover with foil and roast on a low heat for 6 hours.

However the more you put in to it the more layers of flavour you will get.

Also if you are using ‘Ome Made Moroccan rub it uses very little salt so you may want to season to your own taste. There is also very little chilli heat in the rub so if you don’t like things to hot don’t worry you will be fine. And if you do like heat? well pile in some extra chilli!

How to serve

Our favourite way of serving slow roasted Moroccan lamb is with Mediterranean flatbreads, Turkish Salad, yoghurt & mint or Tzatziki and a generous splash of ‘Ome Made Chilli Sauce!

However it could be served with cous cous, savoury rice, tabbouleh or even part of a more Traditional Sunday Roast.

For The Recipe Of Slow Roasted Lamb Moroccan Style Click Here

Slow Roasted Lamb Moroccan Style

Roasted Lamb Moroccan Style

Slow Roasted Lamb Moroccan Style

Slow Roasted Lamb Moroccan Style

Slow roasted lamb Moroccan style is such an easy recipe. You can even prepare it the day before so that you can just put it in the oven the following day. Cooked Low & Slow it means you can get on with other things during the day.

For more details on this recipe click here.

For an easy to follow Mediterranean Flatbread recipe see the ‘Ome Made Group. This bread is ideal for serving with Moroccan flavoured lamb.

Slow Roasted Moroccan Lamb
Slow Roasted Lamb Moroccan Style

Roasted Lamb Moroccan Style

'Ome
Slow Roasted Moroccan Lamb is such a tasty dish and it is really easy. Not only that, but while it's in the oven working it's magic you can get on with other things. Ideal if you're wanting some quality time with the family.
No ratings yet
Prep Time 30 mins
Cook Time 6 hrs
Total Time 6 hrs 30 mins
Course Main Dish
Cuisine Mediterranean
Servings 8 people

Ingredients
  

  • 1 whole lamb shoulder Or 1/2 shoulder (just halve ingredients)
  • 2 tablespoons 'Ome Made Moroccan Rub-a-Dub-Rub Or your own spices or other shop bought
  • 2 whole garlic cloves crushed or grated
  • 2 teaspoons salt

Instructions
 

  • Rub all the ingredients in to the lamb shoulder. If you have time, do this the night before and leave in the fridge to marinate. Let the lamb come up to room temperature before cooking by taking out of the fridge an hour before cooking. Pre-heat the oven to 165°C (conventional oven) or 145℃ (fan oven)
  • Place the lamb in a roasting pan, ideally on a rack so that it doesn't sit on the bottom of the pan. Add about 100ml of water to the pan. Cover the lamb with a piece of greaseproof/baking paper if you have it. Place a couple pieces of tin foil over the pan and seal the edges around the pan to stop moisture escaping. Put in the oven and turn the oven down to 130℃ or 110℃ for fan assisted. Leave to cook for around 6 hours.
  • After 6 hours, carefully take the lamb out of the oven. Turn the oven to a high temperature 220℃ for conventional or 200℃ for fan. Remove the tinfoil from the pan and the greaseproof paper if you used. The lamb should be cooked and almost falling off the bone. Put the lamb back in the oven for another 20 - 30 minutes for the skin to crisp up. remove from the oven and carefully take the lamb from the pan and place on a warmed serving dish. leave to rest for 10 - 15 minutes. remove the bones and gently pull the meat apart with a couple of forks. You will see a tendon with a little fat around which you can remove. Before serving spoon a little of the juices from the pan over the meat.
  • Serve with some Turkish Salad (shredded cabbage, carrot & onion), flatbreads, tzatziki or yoghurt and mint and chilli sauce. Alternatively serve with cous cous, tabbouleh, savoury rice or new potatoes.
Tried this recipe?Let us know how it was!